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Image of the Month
Posted Date: July 1, 2016
july-2016

Figure 1:  Empty states STM images of 0.4 ML Si deposition on bare Si (100) surface at 250 C (deposition rate is 0.4 ML/min) and H terminated at 140 ◦C. (Applied Surface Science 378 (2016) 301–307)

Low temperature Si epitaxy has become increasingly important due to its critical role in the encapsulation and performance of buried nanoscale dopant devices. We demonstrate epitaxial growth up to nominally 25 nm, at 250C, with analysis at successive growth steps using STM and cross section TEM to reveal the nature and quality of the epitaxial growth. STM images indicate that growth morphology of both Si on Si and Si on H-terminated Si (H: Si) is epitaxial in nature at temperatures as low as 250C. For Si on Si growth at 250C, we show that the Si epitaxial growth front maintains a constant morphology after reaching a specific thickness threshold. Although the in-plane mobility of silicon is affected on the H: Si surface due to the presence of H atoms during initial sub-monolayer growth, STM images reveal long range order and demonstrate that growth proceeds by epitaxial island growth albeit with noticeable surface roughening.

Credits:
Xiao Deng1,2, Pradeep Namboodiri2,, Kai Li2, Xiqiao Wang2,3, Gheorghe Stan2, Alline F. Myers2, Xinbin Cheng1, Tongbao Li1, Richard M. Silver2

1 School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, People’s Republic of Chinab

2 National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899, United States

3 University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740, United States

Images and data graciously provided by Pradeep Namboodiri, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland.

Microscope:
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Press Releases
Posted Date: June 14, 2016

June 14, 2016 – As part of our ongoing mission to enhance our technical support in Asia and to support our rapidly growing sales and innovation in China, we are proud to announce the addition of Dr. Rory Chen.

Dr. Chen earned his PhD from Freie Universität Berlin Germany, Department of Physics (Research group of Prof. Katharina J. Franke).  His dissertation research was on “Structural, Electronic and Switching Properties of Metalloporphyrin Molecules on Metal Surfaces a Combined STM and AFM Study”

“The addition of Dr. Rory Chen further strengthens our wonderful team in China while offering additional support to our users across Asia.  Dr. Chen has extensive experience in UHV SPM.  We look forward to him being an excellent resource to our rapidly-growing customer base in Asia”, said Adam Kollin President of RHK.

”As one of the largest research instrumentation distributors in the world, Quantum Design is pleased to have a longstanding cooperation with RHK Technology in the Asian market since 2008.  We are glad to see the exciting increase of sales in our territory.  Through our ongoing effort of building a strong local support team, we aim to deliver faster and better service to our customers and our partners”, said Lambert CAO General Manager of Quantum Design China

RHK Technology, Inc., the innovation leader in cryogen-free scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and SPM control systems enables research in major universities and government laboratories around the globe. RHK is based in Troy, MI, USA. www.rhk-tech.com

 

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Events
Event Date: June 7, 2016

June 7th and 8th
University of Illinois
Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory
http://www.mrl.illinois.edu/events/conferences-workshops/advanced-materials-characterization-workshop-2016

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Image of the Month
Posted Date: June 1, 2016
RHK-June-IOM-2016-Fu-PRB_93_045430

Figure 1: Zoomed 5 nm image. Using Fourier filtering of the larger raw image, the superlattice is removed, and only the crystal lattice remains. Specifically, in filtering, we selected all of the crystallographic Bragg peaks connected by reciprocal lattice vectors appearing in the FFT. (PHYSICAL REVIEW B 93, 045430 (2016))

We use scanning tunneling microscopy to study the lithium molybdenum purple bronze (Li0.9Mo6O17) at room temperature. Our measurements allow us to identify the single-crystal cleave plane and show that it is possible to obtain clean cleaved surfaces reflecting the crystal structure without the complications of nanoscale surface disorder. In addition to the crystal lattice, we observe a coexisting discommensurate superlattice with wave vectors q = 0.5a ± 0.25b. We propose that the origin of the superstructure is a surface reconstruction that is driven by cleaving along a crystal plane that contains in-plane MoO4 tetrahedra connected to out-of-plane MoO6 octahedra through corner-sharing oxygens. When combined with spectroscopic measurements, our studies show a promising avenue through which to study the complex physics within Li0.9Mo6O17.

Credits:
Ling Fu,1  Aaron M. Kraft,1  Martha Greenblatt,2  and Michael C. Boyer1,*  (Phys. Rev. B 93, 045430 (2016))

1 Department of Physics, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610, USA

2 Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA

Images and data graciously provided by Michael Boyer, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts.

Microscope:
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Control System:
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